t: +44 (0) 1478 470178 e: [email protected]

Dave Broom Reviews Our Single Malt

Since Whisky Writer Dave Broom officially opened our distillery in 2017, he has been kind enough to return each year to lend insight into our developing spirit.

This made his appearance at our special virtual Isle of Raasay Single Malt launch event on 4th June all the more special.

Chinquapin’s summoning of breakfast time at a classic American diner – maple syrup, fried banana, cinnamon toast, cherry cola and (in the peated expression) the savoury note of crisped-up bacon bits. Was that also a touch of warm leatherette?

The rye casks were slightly leaner, the unpeated lightly perfumed, with grass, green apple and delicate juiciness; more mineral accented, vegetal and bright when the peat was involved.

Na Sia – Raasay Distillery's Six Cask Story

The red wine has none of the smothering vinosity that’s become wearily commonplace. By allowing the spirit to penetrate deeper into the oak the colour isn’t blush pink, but onion skin. Fruity, sure, but not a fruit bomb. The blackcurrant, plum, and rhubarb are balanced by spice. Woodsmoke and black cherry are to the fore in the peated. Each combination spins the new makes into new directions. Layers are created.Dave Broom, ‘Raasay Revival’, www.whiskymanual.co.uk

Chinquapin’s summoning of breakfast time at a classic American diner – maple syrup, fried banana, cinnamon toast, cherry cola and (in the peated expression) the savoury note of crisped-up bacon bits. Was that also a touch of warm leatherette?

The rye casks were slightly leaner, the unpeated lightly perfumed, with grass, green apple and delicate juiciness; more mineral accented, vegetal and bright when the peat was involved.

The red wine has none of the smothering vinosity that’s become wearily commonplace. By allowing the spirit to penetrate deeper into the oak the colour isn’t blush pink, but onion skin. Fruity, sure, but not a fruit bomb. The blackcurrant, plum, and rhubarb are balanced by spice. Woodsmoke and black cherry are to the fore in the peated. Each combination spins the new makes into new directions. Layers are created.Dave Broom, ‘Raasay Revival’, www.whiskymanual.co.uk

You can read some more of Dave’s reflections on the Isle of Raasay Single Malt and our story so far on his website, the whiskymanual.co.uk, along with his brilliant tasting notes featured below.

ISLE OF RAASAY SINGLE MALT

TASTING NOTES BY WHISKY WRITER DAVE BROOM

NOSE:

There’s very gentle smoke among the sweet, slightly fleshy fresh fruits, dry grass/green bracken and, in the background, a slight mineral note and touch of wet linen. Give it time to rest and some weight is added to the fruits (plum, raspberry), as well as peppery spice. Water opens it up fully. There’s a greater sense of space and also depth. It’s more herbal, but there’s also banana peel, black cherry as well as a new, slightly charred, element to the smoke.

PALATE:

A very soft, sweet start with some green apple, and boiled sweets, with the red and black fruits working well, and the peat drifting along. There’s a succulence in the centre providing a lovely balance between the juicy, now cherry-accented fruits, and the sweet spices, with the smoke little more than the smell of a distant bonfire. Water adds softness but also length and shows the layering effect to its advantage.

FINISH:

Pepper, mineral salts, fruit skin and light smoke.